IE Seminars 2017: Short Descriptions

IE Seminars 2017: Short Descriptions

2017年度 I.E. SEMINARS 授業

※ 以下においては、A = Seminar A(週180分、4単位)、B = Seminar B(週90分、2単位)

NOTE: Students should base their decisions about whether or not to take an IE SEMINAR from what is written in the student guide on the topic rather than from the descriptions given below.

A~C組用(火曜)

★前期開講

1) (COMMUNICATION) NOTABLE PEOPLE AND EVENTS FROM THE PAST

– Zhanje, W.T. (A, Tue 2-3)

This seminar is a chance to learn about history through people in our own lives who have lived that history and also through researching the lives of famous people. Students will need to videotape, transcribe and reflect upon an interview of an elderly family member concerning his/her past experiences, as well as give two presentations on historical persons of their choice. The final project will be a group effort to produce a short video highlighting one person or event.

2) (COMMUNICATION) PSYCHOLOGY: WHY WE THINK AND ACT AS WE DO

– Dias, J. V. (B, Tue 3)

Psychology is a fascinating and diverse field with a rich history. This seminar will demonstrate how our understanding of the human mind and behavior was influenced by the historical context, religion, philosophy, and the current state of knowledge about the world. We will not only study about some of the great minds and personalities of psychology—such as Freud, Jung, Alder, Piaget and Skinner—but we will also look into several of its subfields, including Social, Developmental, and Positive Psychology. Along the way, students will learn through replications of experiments and by completing interesting psychological tests and assessments.

★後期開講

3) (LITERATURE) FRANKENSTEIN: THROUGH MYTH AND MEDIA

– Armstrong, H. (A, Tue 2-3) [Same as in F14, F15, F16]

This class will examine the literature that sprang from Mary Shelley’s gothic novel, Frankenstein, about a monster created from the dead who turns against humanity. We will examine that original work and see how this classic myth of the destructive power of science has been interpreted in films and in the short stories of Herman Melville, Stephen Crane, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, and Hanns Heinz Ewers.

4) (COMMUNICATION) SOCIAL AND GLOBAL ISSUES

– Bollinger, D. (A, Tue 2-3)   [Same as F11, F12, F13, F14, F15, F16]

This seminar explores contemporary social and global issues such as fair trade, animal rights, noise pollution, social media trends, domestic violence and conflict resolution from a gender-based perspective. Using a variety of selected print and online resources, video and other media, learners will research and examine a variety of student-selected topics through group projects and presentations, student-led group discussions, interviews and individual research projects. Throughout the semester, students will keep a language journal to record their ideas and opinions, to reflect on issues explored in class, and to acquire and practice using new vocabulary related to class topics. In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare a final portfolio containing project reports, group and individual presentations and a self-assessment of their learning in the course.

5) (COMMUNICATION) EXPLORING AFRICA

– Zhanje, W.T. (A, Tue 2-3)   [Same as F14, F15, F16]

The purpose of this course is to gain an overview of African countries. Students will choose a country that is of interest to them. We will cover their histories, geographies, demographics, literature, economies, politics, music, and traditions. Students will apply the research skills they have developed in their IE classes to seek reliable and relevant sources about Africa online. These sources will be used to prepare reports for discussion. There will be quizzes, a poster presentation, and reports.

6) (LITERATURE) TRUE NORTH: CANADIAN STUDIES THROUGH LITERATURE, MUSIC, AND DRAMA

– Strong, G.B. (A, Tue 2-3)   [F12, F16]

Through reading Canadian short stories from Mordechai Richler and Roch Carrier, poetry from Margaret Atwood and Robert Service, and listening to contemporary singers from Celine Dionne to Avril Lavigne, watching scenes from films and documentaries, and looking at Canadian art, we will examine the contribution of First Nations people to contemporary Canada (particularly, the Indians of the Pacific Northwest) as depicted in traditional legends as well as the themes of exploring, pioneering, gender issues, the environment, bicultural conflict, and multiculturalism. Students in this course will take turns leading group discussions, role play scenes from films, and develop a group presentation.

7) (COMMUNICATION) SOCIAL ISSUES IN JAPAN

– Schnickel, J. (B, Tue 2)   [F14, F15, F16]

This class will analyze a number of current local issues such as bullying, the hikikomori disorder, addiction to Facebook, and other psychological conditions. The focus will be on developing an understanding of the underlying factors which perpetuate these phenomena. The class will look at current research, journal articles, newspaper reports, statistics and YouTube accounts. Students will be encouraged to share their own experiences and to find original materials where possible and later present on these to the class.

D~F(金曜)

★前期開講SPRING SEMESTER

8) (LITERATURE) BLOOD GOTHIC: THE LITERARY ORIGINS OF THE VICTORIAN VAMPIRE

– Armstrong, H. (A, Fri 3-4)   [Same as S11, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16]

This class will examine the literature that launched the global obsession with the eternal vampire. Beginning with world folk myths, we will progress to reading (and rewriting as short skits) excerpts from Thomas Preskett Prest’s Varney the Vampire, or The Feast of Blood (1847); Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla (1871); and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We will also research and view key short scenes from Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922), the German expressionist film directed by F. W. Murnau. In class presentations, we will share Victorian poetry, art presentations, and we will trace the family tree of world vampire lore through Gothic literature up to characters from the popular 2005 movie Twilight.

9) (COMMUNICATION) TEACHING TRADITIONAL JAPANESE CULTURE TO FOREIGNERS

– Martin, J. (B, Fri 3) [Same as S11, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16]

This seminar offers students the chance to choose a particular aspect of traditional Japanese culture to teach to foreigners. The topic could be anything from Japanese language to martial arts to Japanese cooking. After examining different lesson plans, students will create their own lessons and present these to the class.

★後期開講

10) (COMMUNICATION) LITERACY EDUCATION FOR PERSONAL EMPOWERMENT AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

– Andrade, M. (A, Fri 3-4)   [Same as F15, F16]

The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of literacy education and its relationship to personal development, critical thinking, human rights, and social justice. It examines literacy from social, economic, political, and educational viewpoints. The first half of the course will examine formal education in a developed country (USA). Using video case studies (Annenberg Learner), the course begins with the principles of reading and writing instruction as they are applied in kindergarten through high school in the United States. Through these case studies, students will gain an understanding of the cross-cultural differences between the American and Japanese educational systems. The second half of the course will examine non-formal education in developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Using video case studies (YouTube) and websites, we will study the work of UNESCO and NGOs such Action Aid (REFLECT), Room to Read, READ Global, and Feed the Minds.

11) (COMMUNICATION) THE ELEMENTS OF FILM 

– Rucynski, T. (A, Fri 3-4)   [F15, F16]

Movies are a wonderfully complex art form in which so much can be communicated. Although movies can be enjoyed without the viewer knowing about the elements that make them engaging, the goal of this seminar will be to learn how to use some basic tools for analyzing and critiquing films. Aspects of film such as editing, lighting, sound, mise en scène and cinematography will be introduced to help interpret them. Issues related to gender, sexuality and star appeal will be discussed as well. In addition to watching films in a variety of genres–and placing them in their social, cultural and historical context–students will write weekly reaction papers, read about film, learn how to discuss film intelligently, and make a short film. Teamwork is essential in movie making as well as in this seminar.

12) (LITERATURE) ZOMBIES IN FILM AND LITERATURE

– Armstrong, H. (A, Fri 3-4)

Zombie-themed shows such as “The Walking Dead,” “Z Nation,” “World War Z,” and “iZombie” have been extremely popular recently, riding on the wave started by the zombie classic “Night of the Living Dead(1968). This seminar will explore the factors that are at the basis of the variety and durability of this “niche” genre. From the neamh mairbh of Irish Celtic mythology, and the aptrgangrs (“again-walkers”) of the Vikings, to the French revenants and Haitian soucriants, and the golem of the Jewish shtetl, the animated dead represent our anxiety over the fragility of social institutions and science, which may produce unknown and unnatural consequences. In this course, we will delve into the 18th-21st century literature that has inspired contemporary “un-dead dead” representations. Scenes from modern and classic zombie-related films and television will be shown and discussed as well.

13) (COMMUNICATION) ACTING THROUGH SCENE WORK

– Howl, P.F. (A, Fri 3-4)   [Same as F15, F16]

This seminar is designed to help students learn about scene performance. Students will acquire an understanding about scenes though reading, discussing and performing scenes. They will write a scene, develop characters, then rehearse and perform it. In addition, students will develop the basics of acting. Students will learn about movement, emotional development and motivation. Students will be graded on attendance, writing the scene, developing the scene and the final performance at the end of the semester, as well as other in-class and homework assignments.

14) (COMMUNICATION) TEACHING CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CULTURE TO FOREIGNERS

– Martin, J. (B, Fri 3) [Same as F11, F12, F13, F14, F15, F16]

Students will experience teaching in a classroom environment first hand. After investigating a range of modern Japanese cultural subjects, the focus in the course will be on the development of a course curriculum centered on the teaching them. In this context, we will explore lesson plans, the creation of possible teaching aids, and developing a syllabus.

G~I組用(木曜)

★前期開講

15) (COMMUNICATION) A WEB OF WORDS: CONTROVERSY ON THE INTERNET

– Dias, J.V. (A, Thur 3-4)   [Same as S11, S12, S13, S14, S15, S16]

What do “smoking in public places,” “eating disorders,” “domestic violence,” and “animal experimentation” have in common? They are representative of topics that students have selected for in depth research in this seminar. Each week, students will access different sorts of electronic sources related to a controversial issue of their choice (e.g., websites, mailing lists, online reference works, Internet radio, and text or broadcast news online). Critical evaluation issues unique to the various sources will be explored and a blog (a kind of web diary) will be kept to chronicle the evolution of students’ thoughts. Ultimately, the blog entries will be organized on student-created websites aimed at giving a fair and reasoned presentation of both sides of the issue, while taking a clear stand.

16) (COMMUNICATION) IMMIGRATION IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

– Miltiadous, M. (B, Thur 3)   [Same as F16]

The course looks at migration in the 20th and 21st centuries, its causes, consequences, and policy implications in the Western world. Over the last century, immigration has transformed many countries, producing significant changes in countries ranging from Australia, America, and oil-rich Middle Eastern states to developing nations. Various aspects of immigration will be explored, including the issues of why people migrate across international borders, whether states can control migration (including “unwanted” migrants), and how the politics of immigration can be understood. This course also examines Japan’s position in relation to immigration. The teacher will introduce weekly themes and then facilitate student-centred class discussions. Students are expected to bring along their own critical questions and critical comments to be discussed in class. In addition, students will carry out weekly assignments and have the opportunity to present and discuss an investigation into one particular immigrant group or crisis. Overall, student participation is essential.

★後期開講

17) (LITERATURE) CLASSICAL AND MODERN MYTHOLOGY: IMAGINATION SHAPING OUR WORLD

– Bruce, J. (A, Thur 3-4)   [Same as F11, F12, F13, F14, F15, F16]

From UFOs to ghosts and cult figures such as Eva Peron, and Elvis Presley, myths are important in world culture. This class will examine key Greek myths and terminology as well as those from other cultures including Hinduism, Islam, and Catholicism, and how myths have evolved to influence literature and Western societies. Discussions, readings, and student presentations will be from Edith Hamilton’s Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes.

18) (COMMUNICATION) FOOD AND CULTURE

– Dias, J.V. (A, Thur 3-4) [Same as F13, F14, F15, F16]

People define food in various ways. Some of the traditional “bush foods” of Australian aborigines, for example, might be far from what Japanese or Americans would consider to be food. What is “edible” is culturally relative. This seminar will look at how food is viewed in its cultural and social context. Topics to be covered will include: food classification systems, the symbolic use of food, food taboos, and food and ethnic identity. Students will have opportunities to explore their relationship to food and how it plays a role in their personal identity. We will also look at controversial and problematic aspects of food, such as eating disorders, obesity, GMO foods, and the radiation-tainted food supply.

19) (LITERATURE) FROM ARTICULATION TO PERFORMANCE

– Hunke, M. (A, Thur 3-4)

In this class students will engage with their own speaking and performance skills through articulatory and acoustic phonetics (IPA), prosody, and a wide variety of performance tasks. These tasks will feature jazz chants, poems, soliloquies, news items, clips from popular TV series (Seinfeld) and other textual and audiovisual sources. Students will engage with these sources in a “hands on” fashion. They will aim to combine their theoretical understanding of speech production with the mimicking of the deliveries of others. Ultimately, this will enable them to discover what types of speech deliveries they are particularly good at and enjoy the most, while simultaneously daring them to engage with task types they find more challenging. The students’ skills will be honed by continuous practice and by monitoring regular audio and video recordings of themselves. Peer feedback will be an integral part of the course, as will feedback from the teacher. Towards the end of the course, students ought to have developed a sound understanding of how to analyse the speech of others and the ability to manipulate their own speech acts in order to achieve any type of desired delivery.

20) (COMMUNICATION) EXAMINING ISSUES THROUGH MUSIC

– Broadbridge, J. (A, Thur 3-4)

In times of trouble, people have long turned to music to both soothe their souls and as a means to express their anger and fears about what is happening in the world around them. This seminar will examine many songs that illustrate the times when they were written and the fears of those times. Students taking this course will examine issues such as the environment, human rights, gentrification, equality, and police brutality through the songs of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, David Bowie, Common, A Tribe Called Quest and more. Students are expected to carry out their own individual research on weekly topics in advance of classes. This will enable them to actively participate in classwork, lead discussions, give formal presentations, take part in debates, and act as critical audience members for classmates. Students will keep a journal chronicling their music listening habits.

21) (COMMUNICATION) CROSSING CULTURES THROUGH FILM

– Strong, G. (B, Thur 3)   [Same as S12, S16]

Through an analysis of setting, conflict, and climax, we will explore scenes from contemporary films such as A Rabbit-Proof Fence (Australia), Bend It Like Beckham (UK), My Best Friend’s Wedding, (U.S.), Slum Dog Millionaire (UK and India), and Whale Rider (New Zealand), we will learn about film media and intercultural values and dialects of English. The course also will trace the development of film, film technology over the last century, and explore the genres of romantic comedy, historical romance, the coming-of-age story, horror, and science fiction. Aspects of film-making such as storyboarding, and camera angles will be discussed.

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